With the holiday season in full swing and 2024 rapidly approaching, we thought now would be a good time to remind employers of the “gifts” given to them by the California Legislature in 2023 that become effective in 2024.  This past year brought several new laws with it that require employers’ attention, including new leave laws, new protected classes, new workplace safety laws, further non-compete prohibitions, minimum wage changes, and several more.  We “unwrap” and summarize those “presents” below.Continue Reading Ringing in the New California Laws

On October 4, 2023, Governor Gavin Newsom signed SB 616, amending California’s statewide paid sick and safe leave law.  Effective January 1, 2024, this amendment increases paid leave hours for employees and accrual amounts and provides some protections for employees covered by certain collective bargaining agreements. Continue Reading California Increases Requirements for Paid Sick Leave

On October 13, 2023, California Governor Gavin Newsom signed into law Senate Bill 525, codifying Labor Code sections 1182.14 and 1182.15.  The new law establishes five separate minimum wage schedules for all health care employees that will become effective June 1, 2024.  The wage schedule departs from the general statewide $15.00 per hour minimum wage applicable to other hourly paid employees, except for restaurant workers who also recently received a minimum wage increase.Continue Reading California Approves Minimum Wage Increase for Health Care Employees

With the assistance of California governor Gavin Newsom, fast food companies that supported a referendum to reverse the 2022 Fast Food Accountability and Standards Recovery Act (“AB 257”) struck a deal with several labor unions, including the Service Employees International Union, to revise some of AB 257’s most controversial provisions.  In exchange for an agreement on this new bill (“AB 1228”), fast food companies agreed to withdraw the referendum that was set for a vote in 2024.Continue Reading California Fast Food Workers Look Forward to Pay Increases

A recent announcement by California Attorney General Rob Bonta may curtail the relief experienced by California’s largest employers who are benefitting from the delayed enforcement of the newest California Consumer Privacy Act (“CCPA”) regulationsContinue Reading CCPA Relief at Risk:  California Attorney General Announces New Investigative Sweep

As we predicted (here), employees can be compelled to individually arbitrate their Labor Code claims under the Private Attorneys General Act of 2004 (“PAGA”), but an arbitration agreement that prohibits employees from bringing a representative action on behalf of other employees in court violates California public policy.  In Adolph v. Uber Technologies, Inc., S274671 (July 17, 2023) (“Adolph”), the California Supreme Court analyzed whether an employee retained standing to bring a PAGA action on behalf of other aggrieved employees despite the existence of a valid arbitration agreement requiring arbitration of the employee’s individual PAGA claims.  The Court answered with an unequivocal and unanimous “yes.”  Continue Reading The California Supreme Court Sets Viking River Cruise Decision Adrift

Companies that have been wrestling with exactly how to comply with the latest regulations under the California Consumer Privacy Act (“CCPA”) can breathe a sigh of relief after a California state court judge ruled last week that the newest regulations cannot be enforced until March 2024.  If you’re familiar with the changes to the CCPA

Although many cities in the Golden State increased their minimum wage on January 1, 2023, various localities in California will increase their minimum wage on July 1, 2023.  Below is a list of the cities and counties that require an increase in the minimum wage for hourly employees:Continue Reading Employers Face Minimum Wage Increases in Certain Cities and Local Areas

The California Supreme Court heard oral argument today in Adolph (Erik) v. Uber Technologies, Inc., S274671, on the question of whether Private Attorneys’ General Act claims under Labor Code section 2698, et seq. (PAGA) can be brought on behalf of other employees in court despite a plaintiff’s agreement to arbitrate his/her individual PAGA claims. Continue Reading Individual Arbitration Agreements and PAGA Representative Claims—Where Do We Stand Now?